WINE THERAPY
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DRINKING WINE

Wine starts with grapes. Grapes can be soft and juicy, sweet and pulpy or sour and flavored.
There are more than 70 types and 3000 sorts of grapes known to date. Some of them have been cultivated since the Antiquity. 
All of them contain a lot of vitamins, minerals and most importantly glucose and fructose, sugars that are easily digested. 
That is why there exist treatments such as wine- and ampelotherapy.
Certain doses of grapes help stabilize the heart rate and blood pressure, reduce edemas, heal shortness of breath, improve appetite and regulate sleep. 
The healing powers of grapes depend on the grape variety. This is also true for wines because wines are a distillation of the grapes' best qualities. 
For instance, white wine is good for treating poor assimilation of protein, fat and natural substances, whereas red wine is used to treat 
Breathing disorders. However grape wines are harmful to diabetics because they contain too much sugar.

Wine starts with grapes. Grapes can be soft and juicy, sweet and pulpy or sour and flavored.
There are more than 70 types and 3000 sorts of grapes known to date. Some of them have been cultivated since the Antiquity. 
All of them contain a lot of vitamins, minerals and most importantly glucose and fructose, sugars that are easily digested. 
That is why there exist treatments such as wine- and ampelotherapy.
Certain doses of grapes help stabilize the heart rate and blood pressure, reduce edemas, heal shortness of breath, improve appetite and regulate sleep. 
The healing powers of grapes depend on the grape variety. This is also true for wines because wines are a distillation of the grapes' best qualities. 
For instance, white wine is good for treating poor assimilation of protein, fat and natural substances, whereas red wine is used to treat 
Breathing disorders. However grape wines are harmful to diabetics because they contain too much sugar.


• Prevent stroke: Some studies have shown that drinking a glass of wine once a day, or even once a week, can reduce the risk of stroke. 
Researchers suggest that the alcohol breaks up blood clots and increases HDL ("good") cholesterol in the bloodstream, 
Thus helping to keep the arteries clean

• Lower risk of certain cancers: Studies have also shown that regular wine drinkers had a lower risk of 
Oral and throat cancers than did non-wine drinkers. Grape skin contains a compound known as resveratrol, 
Which has been studied as an effective agent in fighting cancer.


• Reduce Stress: Wine's calming influence also adds to its appeal and health attributes.
Some people find that a glass of wine with dinner relaxes the body and helps with the mental transition between work and rest. 
In addition, patients coping with various illnesses or stresses can often achieve greater results when calm and focused.

It's important to keep in mind that alcohol is toxic to the liver and to the nervous system. 
Most wines also contain sulfites and other additives that may be harmful to your health. 
If you drink wine and want to get the maximum health benefit, it's advisable to drink in moderation, and select an organic red wine if possible. 
Organic grapes will likely contain fewer unhealthy residues of pesticides and fungicides than conventionally grown grapes, 
And some studies also show a higher nutrient content in organically grown produce.

How is red wine heart healthy?

Research studies on the heart-health benefits of red wine have reported mixed results. Some studies show that red wine seems to have even more heart-health benefits than other types of alcohol, while other studies show that red wine isn't any better than beer, white wine or liquor for heart health. There's still no clear evidence yet that red wine is superior to other forms of alcohol when it comes to possible heart-health benefits.

The studies supporting red wine suggest antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. These antioxidants come in two main forms: flavonoids and nonflavonoids.

 

Resveratrol in red wine

Resveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces "bad" cholesterol and prevents blood clots.

Most research on resveratrol has been conducted on animals, not people. Research in mice given resveratrol has indicated that the antioxidant might also help protect them from obesity and diabetes, both of which are strong risk factors for heart disease. However, those findings were reported only in mice, not in people. In addition, to get the same dose of resveratrol used in the mice studies, a person would have to consume 100 to 1,000 bottles of red wine a day.

Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting, both of which can lead to heart disease. More research is needed before it's known whether resveratrol was the cause for the reduced risk.

Some companies sell supplements containing resveratrol. However, not enough is known about resveratrol's effects to endorse resveratrol supplements. Research into the potential heart-health benefits of resveratrol is continuing.

 

 

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Resveratrol in grapes and other foods

The resveratrol in red wine comes from the skin of grapes used to make wine. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins longer than is white wine, red wine contains more resveratrol. Simply eating grapes, or drinking grape juice, has been suggested as one way to get resveratrol without drinking alcohol. Some studies have suggested that red and purple grape juices have some of the same heart-healthy benefits of red wine.

Other foods that contain some resveratrol include peanuts, blueberries and cranberries. It's not yet known how beneficial eating grapes or other foods might be compared with drinking red wine when it comes to promoting heart health. The amount of resveratrol in food and red wine can vary widely.

How does alcohol help the heart?

Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:

Drink in moderation” or not at all

Red wine's potential heart-health benefits look promising. Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, including red wine, seem to have a lower risk of heart disease. However, more research is needed before we know whether red wine is better for your heart than are other forms of alcohol, such as beer or spirits.

Neither the American Heart Association nor the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend that you start drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Alcohol can be addictive and is associated with other health issues.

Drinking too much increases your risk of high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver damage, obesity, certain types of cancer, accidents and other problems. In addition, even small amounts of alcohol can cause cardiomyopathy — weakened heart muscle — causing symptoms of heart failure in some people. If you have heart failure or a weak heart, you should avoid alcohol completely. If you take aspirin daily, you should avoid or limit alcohol, depending on your doctor's advice. You also shouldn't drink alcohol if you're pregnant. If you have questions about the benefits and risks of alcohol, talk to your doctor about specific recommendations for you.

If you already drink red wine, do so in moderation. Moderate drinking is defined as an average of two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women.

A drink is defined as 12 ounces (355 milliliters, or mL) of beer, 5 ounces (148 mL) of wine or 1.5 ounces (44 mL) of 80-proof distilled spirits.

The limit for men is higher because men generally weigh more and have more of an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol than women do.

 

Disclaimer: All material has been reviewed to ensure the maximum accuracy and most current information available. 
This information should NOT be used in place of an individual consultation with your physician or other qualified health care provider.